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Khalistan

 

5 Dollars, 1980

5 Dollars, 1980 front
5 Dollars, 1980 back

Enlarge: Front5 Dollars, 1980 front
 & Back5 Dollars, 1980 back

The note was issued in 1980 as a donation receipt by a group of Sikhs living in British Columbia, Canada.

Front: Jagjit Singh Chauha (1929-2007), founder of the Khalistan movement to create an independent Sikh state

Back: Golden Temple at Amritsar, the spiritual center for the Sikhs

 

10 Dollars, 1980

10 Dollars, 1980 front
10 Dollars, 1980 back

Enlarge: Front10 Dollars, 1980 front
 & Back10 Dollars, 1980 back

The note was issued in 1980 as a donation receipt by a group of Sikhs living in British Columbia, Canada.

Front: Amritsar Golden Temple

Back: Banda Singh Bahadur (1670-1716), Sikh military commander

courtesy heritage auctions

 

50 Dollars, 2008

50 Dollars, 2008 front
50 Dollars, 2008 back

Enlarge: Front50 Dollars, 2008 front
 & Back50 Dollars, 2008 back

This propaganda note is the rarest of all the issues, only one known at present. It was printed much later than the first two notes, and probably not in Canada.

Front: Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale (1947-1984), leader of the Sikh organization Damdami Taksal

Back: Sri Takhat Sahib (Throne of the Immortal); General Shubeg Singh (1925-1984), Indian Army officer

psywar.org

 

100 Dollars, 2008

100 Dollars, 2008 front
100 Dollars, 2008 back

Enlarge: Front100 Dollars, 2008 front
 & Back100 Dollars, 2008 back

This Propaganda note appeared on the market in 2008. It is believed to have been printed in Germany.

Front: Akal Takht (The Seat of the Timeless One) in the Golden Temple complex in Amritsar, Punjab; Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale (1947-1984), leader of the Sikh organization Damdami Taksal

Back: Sikh symbol; Sirdar Kapur Singh (1909-1986), a Former Member of the Indian Parliament

courtesy psywar.org

Back to Asia

Khalistan refers to a global political movement to create a separate Sikh state called Khalistan, consisting of the Punjab region from parts of India and Pakistan.

Currency for Khalistan was part of Surjan Singh Gill's campaign from Vancouver to promote a Sikh homeland. The Sikhs have sought independence from India since 1947, claiming territory from the Jamna River on the east to the border with Pakistan on the west. To publicize their demand for independence, Dal Khalsa (Sikh Empire - named after the Sikh army that operated in 17th and 18th-century Punjab), a fringe movement of the Akali Dal, printed propaganda banknotes in 1980 for the Republic of Khalistan advocating the formation of an independent Sikh state in the Indian Punjab. Akali Dal, a collection of disparate Sikh factions desiring more autonomy for Sikhs in India, does not generally support the separatist Khalistan movement. Dal Khalsa has active branches in the West. Their constitution states in part that Dal Khalsa is a social-religious-political organization of the Sikh nation. The primary goal of the Dal Khalsa is the establishment of self-rule for Sikhs.

 

 

 

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